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Hawk Ridge Trail

 5.0 (1)

4.2 Miles 6.7 Kilometers


97%

Runnable

341' 104 m

Ascent

-343' -104 m

Descent

3%

Avg Grade (2°)

19%

Max Grade (11°)

728' 222 m

High

513' 156 m

Low

Conditions


All Clear 81 days ago
Dry - half paved, half gravel. 5' width. good dog run with leashes History

Getting forecast...

A scenic loop through the fields and woods of Queeny Park.

St. Louis County Parks

Dogs Unknown

Features Fall Colors · Lake · Wildflowers · Wildlife

Description

The Hawk Ridge Trail skirts the perimeter of Queeny Park. There are a number of places to access the trail either from Weidman Road or Mason Road. It is a multi-use trail that is paved in some sections and gravel in others. You may encounter other hikers, runners, and bikers along the trail.

Beginning from the Mason Road side of the park and heading north, the trail goes through an open field before entering the woods. Once in the woods, you'll enjoy the shade of mature oaks and hickories, some of which are nearly 70 feet tall. Dogwoods and redbuds also grow in the woods, making up the natural shrub layer. Look for spicebush and paw paw in the valleys. You'll also notice dense stands of honeysuckle in many parts of these woods. This exotic shrub is not native to the park, and its dense foliage threatens the native plants and shrubs. Steps have been taken at Queeny to eliminate honeysuckle in some parts of the park.

The trail continues through the woods before heading into the fields next to the North Twin Pond. For nearly a mile, the trail will stay out in the open field where you'll notice equestrian jumps. This part of the trail is gravel. The trail then re-enters the woods and follows an old farm lane. A pasture to the west is occasionally used by the park's department for horses.

Once you leave the woods, you'll continue past a large parking lot and another field above the recreational complex. In the late spring to early summer, there is a wildflower display here that is quite beautiful. The trail then crosses over Owl Creek and alongside Jarville Lake before heading up a steep and lengthy climb to the Jarville House. This house, which was built in 1854 and is one if the best surviving examples of the Greek Revival style in Missouri, is utilized by the Museum of the Dog.

Flora & Fauna

Oak, hickory, dogwood, redbuds, and wildflowers.

Contacts

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Check-Ins

May 25, 2018
Andrew Rasdall
4mi

Trail Ratings

  5.0 from 1 vote

#1640

Overall
  5.0 from 1 vote
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Rankings

#23

in Missouri

#1,640

Overall
27 Views Last Month
300 Since Dec 2, 2015
Easy/Intermediate Easy/Intermediate

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