Nankoweap

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Trail

12.1 Miles 19.4 Kilometers

 

76% 

Runnable

Singletrack

1,462' 446 m

Ascent

-5,357' -1,633 m

Descent

7,568' 2,307 m

High

2,875' 876 m

Low

11%

Avg Grade (6°)

45%

Max Grade (24°)

Unknown

Update

This trail rewards visitors with magnificent views, solitude, and fascinating human history.

Nicholas Shannon

Overview

This trail is classified as MOST difficult of the named trails in Grand Canyon. It has the largest total rim-to-river drop (5640 ft / 1735 m) and is one of the longest trails. Runners must be experienced in canyon route finding; this trail is not recommended for inexperienced or solo runners. The Nankoweap Trail is not enjoyable as a summer run as there is no water and little shade until Nankoweap Creek. The run will require a minimum of 4 to 6 liters of water per person, per day.
Features: Birding — Cave — Fall Colors — River/Creek — Views — Wildflowers — Wildlife
Dogs: No Dogs

Description

Part of this trail is located within the Saddle Mountain Wilderness and the rest is within the Grand Canyon National Park. This trail climbs to Nankoweap Saddle, passing through big Ponderosa pine, red and white cliffs and steep canyons. At the saddle, you can view a multitude of jagged buttes and the drainages of Marble Canyon. They can then enter the Grand Canyon National Park.

It soon becomes a proper trail and descends into a deep ravine. At a fork in the trail at the ravine bottom, bear right to follow the creek. The trail crosses the creek several times over the course of about a half mile, then exits the creek bed to the south and travels continuously upward through forest toward the saddle.

As you enter the canyon you enter the Supai Formation. The trail turns south and descends quickly through the uppermost Supai cliffs (Esplanade Sandstone). At the bottom of the switchbacks you begin a lengthy traverse, remaining immediately below the Esplanade for the next five miles or so. On a map, it appears to be fairly level, but in reality the trail continuously ascends and descends and there is much exposure.

The trail is often only one footprint wide, loose and gravelly, with a 10-150+ feet of drop off. This trail is not recommended for people with a fear of heights. One place that may be confusing is where the trail passes Marion Point. Here it makes an immediate turn to the north continuing the traverse and does NOT continue out to Marion Point. Just beyond where the trail passes Marion Point, near the head of a canyon, it passes just below a very small seasonal seep under a ledge.

The traverse continues in a rising and falling pattern until it approaches the ridge leading down to Tilted Mesa. There it begins a gradual descent through the remainder of the Supai and becomes steeper on the ridge. Two short cliffs are descended with the aid of a couple of trees. Excellent campsites are located at the top of each of these cliffs. The trail soon reaches the top of the Redwall limestone on the isthmus between Nankoweap and Little Nankoweap Canyons. The trail continues on or near the ridge until dropping off to the southwest and beginning the descent through the Redwall.

After traversing the lower reaches of Tilted Mesa, the trail continues a mild descent down the top of a wide, round, stable ridge. This ravine empties onto a large alluvial terrace above Nankoweap Creek. The trail stays on the terrace until dropping down to the creek.

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  5.0 from 1 vote

#1258

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Rankings

#48

in Arizona

#1,258

Overall
12 Views Last Month
141 Since May 7, 2015
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